Saturday, May 19, 2018

CCAE: Contact Your Legislators!

CCAE is the California Council of Adult Education.  It is the only organization that includes students, staff, teachers, administrators, and community members.

California is the fifth largest economy in the world.  It has a lot of money.  Adult Education and Adult Schools do not have enough money.

Now is the time to ask legislators - the people we choose to represent us - to spend our taxes on Adult Education and Adult Schools.

Here is info from CCAE:

Contact Your Legislators

As you may know, on Friday the Governor released his May Revise Budget proposal for FY 18-19.  We are pleased to report and strongly support the package which continues to include a COLA for adult education, provide language to cap the indirect rate districts can charge back to adult schools, and provide an extra year for development of consortia three-year plans.  Unfortunately, the Administration and Department of Finance (DOF) opted not to include the remaining priorities the adult education field strongly advocated for so as to continue to move adult education forward under the Adult Education Block Grant.
While not included in the Governor's May Revise, we still have the opportunity to affect the outcome of the final budget.  In this regard, we strongly urge all teachers, classified staff, students, administrators, family, friends, and other supportive individuals to send an email to your respective Senator and Assemblymember urging them to voice the need for 1) additional funding for adult education, 2) inclusion of immigrant integration metrics in the AEBG, and to 3) change the term "Grant" in the Adult Education Block Grant.

Click the link and scroll down to "Send an Email."


Additionally, we strongly urge you to also call your respective Senator and Assemblymember's Sacramento and District offices urging them to let the Budget Committees know that their community and constituents strongly support more funding to support adult education and the beneficial, life-changing impact it has on our students and their families.

Click the link and scroll down to "Make a Phone Call" to access your state representative's office numbers.




Friday, April 6, 2018

CCAE April Communicator E-Newsletter


Student Success: Isela Jimenez  
Submitted by Northern Section  

When you walk into Folsom Cordova Community Partnership Job Center, located on the Folsom Cordova Adult School campus, you are greeted with the smiling face of Isela Diaz Jiminez with either a "hello" or an "ola." Isela is an administrative assistant at the Job Center. She is one of Folsom Cordova Adult School's (FCAS) many shining success stories. Isela started out in FCAS's Adult Basic Education to work on her math, reading, and writing and to prepare for the HiSET Class. After about a year Isela passed the HiSET tests and set her sights on the office Technologies CTE pathway. At FCAS she completed Office Technologies along with the QuickBooks Certification. After graduating and receiving the office certifications, Isela started an internship at the Job Center. Eventually, she was promoted to a full-time paying job with benefits. Isela is extremely helpful at the Job Center-helping job candidates find the resources and staff that will help them on the next step in their employment path. Isela could have settled for a minimum wage job, but she pushed herself to pass the HiSET and get the Office Technologies Certification. This is what FCAS is all about-determining students' goals and getting them on the pathway to achieving their goals.    
 

Download FREE posters and fact sheets (samples below) HERE. 
 
Take Action for Adult Education
 
Engage your legislators, assembly members, and senators. There has not been a time in over 10 years when both legislative support and state funding have lined up so positively for adult education. Thanks to the recent work of our advocate, Dawn Koepke, and other key adult education supporters there is a state level interest in adult education. But that interest can quickly fade as other organizations also lobby for funding. Now is the time to engage locally. Visit your legislators. Call or email their offices. Speak with the staff. Let them know how important adult education is to your community and the students you serve. Listen to the CCAE key talking points here
 
Engage your consortia. Much of the positive feedback we receive is around the work that is being done collaboratively with partner organizations in our regional consortia. We have come a long way to build relationships, create pathways to college and career, leverage funds and resources, and bring back services to adult learners. This collaborative work is providing adult school students opportunities for advancement that were not present or clearly available before. In addition, significant investments into student support services have also been made across programs. We must continue these collaborative efforts, and other promising practices, and truly create the seamless pathways and accelerated learning programs that our students need and that our state needs. In this way we will continue to demonstrate the superior value of adult education. Also, plan to join us on CCAE's annual Legislative Day in Sacramento, April 9-10. This year we're planning an Adult Education Rally on the steps of the Capitol Building. Materials for local and Sacramento visits are on the CCAE website hereYou are free to print out all of these materials yourself. These materials are the ones referenced in the webinar sited below. Watch for additional information regarding Leg Day soon!
 
Engage your CCAE State Board. In order to best plan for the coming year, the CCAE State Board has embarked on a strategic planning process that will gather input from all aspects of the organization. A vital component of that input is your voice. Please take a few minutes to give us feedback here
 
Engage your students. Of course, you already engage your students every day they are in class. But what I am talking about is engaging them a little deeper. What are their plans for the next year? What are their challenges? What jobs are they considering? What other schools are they considering attending? As we move into the world of increased accountability it is becoming more important to build strong relationships with our students so that we can better support them, possibly providing or connecting them to additional resources, but also better measure and report their successes. In many ways, those who engage with students frequently might be the most important component of the accountability system being developed.
 
Again, now is the time to engage. Next month might just be too late. Next week might be too late. Don't wait for someone else to stand up for you, your school, and your students. Now is the time to stand up and make your voice heard.
Leg Day Webinar
Watch our archived edition of the Leg Day webinar to ensure you have the tools you need to hold successful and productive legislative visits: HERE.
Finish Your Diploma 
 
Would you like your program to be listed so that thousands of potential adult students can learn about and access your adult program's services? Add your program here.  
CALPRO Professional Development
 
Enjoy outstanding professional development offered by our partner, CALPRO.  
April Highlights HERE
April Flyer HERE.
OTAN Professional Development
 
View the list of OTAN training sessions being offered in April and May HERE

                                           To register click HERE
We Have a Great CCAE Conference Line-Up! 

Check out the conference sessions HERE.
Register and sign up for events HERE.
Make your hotel reservations HERE.
The cost of the conference is generously underwritten by our sponsors HERE. This enables us to pass the savings on to you, our members.
Address book
AEBG Consortium Directory

CCAE is compiling a directory of adult education providers which will include primary contacts, program areas they deliver instruction in, and total number of students served. The goal is to strengthen local sharing of best practices by creating a directory of programs that is easy to use. Complete the short form HERE to participate.
Attractive young African woman dressed in jeans shirt using generic smart phone texting sms to her friend looking at gadget screen with serious expression while waiting for her lunch at cozy cafe
All You Need to Know Is on the CCAE App

Want to be "in the know" about the latest topics in adult education? You will hear it first when you download the CCAE App HERE. If you are already using the App, be sure to switch to the 2018 Event. If you need assistance, contact membership@ccaestate.org.
California Council for Adult Education (CCAE), PO Box 978, Los Alamitos, CA 90720

Survey: K-12 Adult School Credential - Keep, Change, Throw Away

The LAO - the Legislative Analyst Office - has recommended getting rid of the K-12 Adult School credential.  (Read more here.)

Please take this survey to share your own opinion and ideas on this topic.

The survey will be closed at the end of April and results will be shared here on the Adult Education Matters blog.


Wednesday, March 21, 2018

Action Step: Advocate for Immigrant Integration


It's time to contact your local legislators and Governor Jerry Brown and advocate for including immigrant integration as part of AEBG - the Adult Ed Block Grant. 

The challenges that the Trump administration have brought upon us have also brought a deeper understanding of the value of immigrants in California and the importance of supporting immigrant integration through Adult Education.

Both the California Immigrant Policy Center and CCAE - the California Council of Adult Education - are advocating for this important change to happen.  

Contact your local legislators and Governor Jerry Brown.  Explain to them why immigrant integration matters.

Here is information from the California Immigrant Policy Center and from CCAE about advocating for including immigrant integration into AEBG. 


California Immigrant Policy Center

Workforce Development & Adult Education
Administrative Advocacy & Budget Advocacy
 
CIPC is continuing our advocacy for equity within California’s adult education and workforce development programs and funding at a local and statewide level. In 2018, we are weighing in on budget proposals from adult education and workforce development stakeholders for increased employment training and services. These include adding “immigrant integration” metrics to the Adult Education Block Grant and funding the Breaking Barriers to Employment Act (AB 1111, 2017).
 
 
 
California Immigrant Policy Center March 13th, 2018 Update

Update:  Governor Brown's 2018 Budget & New Proposals -
 
 

Adult Education & Workforce Development


Adult Education Block Grant -
The Adult Education Block Grant (AEBG) is an important source of state funding to programs and services that provide adults with the knowledge needed to be prepared for the workforce, such as English language courses, GED attainment, and vocational skills. These programs also support integration and inclusion outcomes for immigrants not seeking employment training but adult education services that support their engagement in community and civic life. This year’s budget continues to sustain the $500 million funding.
  • Budget Proposal: A proposal from adult education stakeholders, the California Council for Adult Education and the California Adult Education Administrators Association, provides a two prong approach to advancing how AEBG funding reaches immigrant communities. The proposal would establish performance based funding that incentives the needs of communities with multiple barriers including limited English proficiency, poverty, and  lack of high school completion, and include “immigrant integration” as a reported outcome for state funding. CIPC will be working with stakeholders and the Legislature

Note:  CCAE - California Council for Adult Education - is recommending that Immigrant Integration metrics are incorporated into AEBG - the Adult Ed Block Grant.

Here is information from CCAE's FY 2018-19 Adult Ed Framework Priorities:
 
INCORPORATE IMMIGRANT INTEGRATION METRICS



Even as collaboration between the systems expands through regional consortium-building and AEBG, the K-12 community-based adult schools still have as their core mission to serve those low basic skills adults who oftentimes get caught in the remediation of post-secondary education. Additionally, the structural and cultural differences between the two systems have become more evident through this planning process and it is critical that the strengths of each be leveraged in ways that support student learning outcomes and appropriate levels of support services. The adult learners that are best served by K12 adult schools must not be left out.
  
- AEBG defines the specific outcomes sought – literacy and career progress.
- Serving immigrant adults in need of English language skills have been at the core of the K12 adult education mission since its inception. They come to adult schools to develop literacy, and in doing so, gain cultural competency and literacy more broadly defined as health, financial, digital literacy, parenting and family literacy, and civic engagement, all also critical to successful transition to college and careers.
 
- Unfortunately, the statute and overall AEBG framework does not explicitly provide for these types of immigrant integration metrics relative to demonstrating outcomes and accountability for student success.
 
- We are concerned that immigrant students who may not yet have the skills to demonstrate outcomes on the current statutory spectrum that focuses solely on literacy and career progress will be left behind as AEBG entities seek to focus on programming for those students for which clear outcomes and progress can be measured and for which funding may eventually be prioritized.
 
- The Alliance for Language Learners’ Integration, Education and Success (ALLIES) is an alliance serving the two-county Silicon Valley region of San Mateo and Santa Clara counties. Launched by a grant of the Silicon Valley Community Foundation in 2010, mission of ALLIES is to advance regional economic and social health through high-impact alliances for immigrant educational and career success. Through this work, ALLIES developed an Immigrant Integration Pathway offering an innovative way to identify and measure the critical factors for successful immigrant integration. The pathway includes eight high-level goal areas that are then further broken down into approaches and supporting objectives. The goals are intended to be: o Used by individuals as well as service providers via common metrics that can help assess if an individual is progressing and/or practices are effective;
 
o Measurable qualitatively and quantitatively;



 
 
o Achievable with milestones under reasonable timeframes; and
o A tool for the immigrant to have ownership of their progress, with the ability to see how incremental gains are related to longer-term goals.1

1 ALLIES Immigrant Integration Pathway Framework White Paper, 2017


 
Using the ALLIES Framework, amend the AEBG statute to explicitly reference and include "immigrant integration metrics" under AEBG.
Amend Education Code Section 84920, as follows:
 
(a) To the extent that one-time funding is made available in the Budget Act of 2015, consistent with the provisions of Section 84917, the chancellor and the Superintendent shall identify common measures for determining the effectiveness of members of each consortium in meeting the educational needs of adults. At a minimum, the chancellor and the Superintendent shall accomplish both of the following:

(1) Define the specific data each consortium shall collect.

(2) Establish a menu of common assessments and policies regarding placement of adults seeking education and workforce services into adult education programs to be used by each consortium to measure educational needs of adults and the effectiveness of providers in addressing those needs.

(b) No later than August 1, 20178, the chancellor and the Superintendent shall report to the Director of Finance, the State Board of Education, and the appropriate policy and fiscal committees of the Legislature on options for integrating the assessments described in subdivision (a) into the common assessment system developed pursuant to Section 78219. The report shall address compliance of the assessments with federal and state funding requirements for adult education programs, identify estimated costs


 
 
and timelines for the assessments, and identify changes in policies that may be needed to avoid duplicate assessments.

(c) It is the intent of the Legislature that both of the following occur:

(1) That the educational needs of adults in the state be better identified and understood through better sharing of data across state agencies.

(2) That, at a minimum, the chancellor and the Superintendent shall enter into agreements to share data related to effectiveness of the consortia between their agencies and with other state agencies, including, but not necessarily limited to, the Employment Development Department and the California Workforce Investment Board.

(d) The chancellor and the Superintendent shall identify, no later than January 1, 2016 August 1, 2018, the measures for assessing the effectiveness of consortia that will be used in the report that is required pursuant to Section 84917. These measures shall include, but not necessarily be limited to, all of the following:

(1) How many adults are served by members of the consortium.

(2) How many adults served by members of the consortium have demonstrated the following, as applicable:

(A) Immigrant integration.

(B) Improved literacy skills.

(BC) Completion of high school diplomas or their recognized equivalents.

(CD) Completion of postsecondary certificates, degrees, or training programs.

(DE) Placement into jobs.

(EF) Improved wages.

(e) The chancellor and the Superintendent shall apportion the funds appropriated for purposes of this section in the Budget Act of 2015 in accordance with both of the following:

(1) Eighty-five percent of these funds shall be used for grants to consortia to establish systems or obtain data necessary to submit any reports or data required pursuant to subdivision (b) of Section 84917.

(2) Fifteen percent of these funds shall be used for grants for development of statewide policies and procedures related to data collection or reporting or for technical assistance to consortia, or both.




(f) The chancellor and the Superintendent shall provide any guidance to the consortia necessary to support the sharing of data included in systems established by consortia pursuant to this section across consortia.



Here's an example of a very successful program which cultivates immigrant integration.

 

 

Civic Success: San Mateo Adult School ESL City Government Academy

An example of immigrant integration in action at San Mateo Adult School, a K-12 Adult School:

New San Mateo Program Educates Immigrants About Local Government
News Desk, March 19th, 2018

From the City of San Mateo: A diverse group of immigrants are getting an exclusive look at critical city services as part of the new English as a Second Language (ESL) City Government Academy. The City of San Mateo, in partnership with the San Mateo Adult School of the San Mateo Union High School District, recently launched the program to educate this new segment of the community about how local government works and to empower them to be able to access available resources and programs provided by the City. This first class of 25 students hail from 10 different countries.
The four-month program, which began in January, aims to expand participants' awareness of local government, and increase civic engagement, leadership and volunteerism.

"Our key goal is for participants to feel empowered and comfortable accessing City services," said City Manager Larry Patterson, who championed the program's inception. "We are particularly excited to be energizing a new segment of our community to become more civically engaged."
The program is the brainchild of Stephanie Kriebel, an educator who is herself a graduate of San Mateo's traditional City Services Academy.

"As an ESL teacher at San Mateo Adult School, I saw an opportunity for us to help bridge the immigrant community we serve with City services to help familiarize our students with what the City does, how it helps the community, and what opportunities lie within the City for them to pursue," Kriebel said.

Academy participants have an opportunity to meet with City staff and learn about local government while also garnering concrete knowledge and skills to empower them in their everyday lives, such as learning how to operate a fire extinguisher and register for a recreation class. For some, even visiting City facilities is novel. For others, the impact of participating in the Academy runs far deeper.
"I honestly think I'm so lucky to live in San Mateo because the City of San Mateo organizes so many events and programs for the community. I come from Guatemala originally, and these kinds of programs help me integrate into the community here. Now I have lots of things I can do," said program participant Edwin Turuy.

Program days include visits to San Mateo's Fire Station 23, Beresford Recreation Center and Park, Police Station, Wastewater Treatment Plant, and City Hall. Future cohorts will also have the opportunity to visit the San Mateo Public Library. The pilot program culminates with a graduation ceremony April 19, 2018.




Photos courtesy of the City of San Mateo (ESL students learn how to operate a fire extinguisher during a tour of a San Mateo fire station.)