Thursday, December 18, 2014

All Out For Berkeley Adult School

Destabilization leads to problems.

Destabilization makes an individual, a group, or an institution vulnerable to disease, infiltration, attack, and at worst, death or extinction.

Stabilization not only keeps the individual, group or institution strong, it enables the individual, group or institution to provide shelter, support, and sustenance to others. 

Help or harm - in domino effect.

All K12 Adult Schools have been destabilized since Governor Schwartzenegger flexed their funding in 2009.

This has led to over 70 Adult Schools closing and all of them shrinking.  There is now a Charter Adult School in the Sacramento Area.  And private enterprises consider Adult Education a prime market to enter and expand.  "While adult education has long been a “hidden” market, its programs often “shoved off in a corner,” all that seems to be changing, says to Pearson SVP Jason Jordan. “Suddenly it’s becoming a much more interesting marketplace.'"


Berkeley Adult School Faces A New Challenge and Potential Crisis

The uncertainty of funding for K12 Adult Schools may be one reason the Berkeley School District is considering moving the Berkeley Adult School out of its campus entirely or in part in order to find space for an increasing number of Elementary School students.

Do Elementary School students need and deserve space?  Of course, they do.

Does a community need and deserve an Adult School?  Absolutely.

Shrinking or dismantling an Adult School, as we can see through what has happened in Oakland and Los Angeles, does not help children, families, and communities thrive and achieve, academically or otherwise.

San Mateo Adult School Student Advocate expressed that very well in her op-ed, "My Dilemma," in the San Mateo Daily Journal.  A similar but less serious situation exists in San Mateo where the D-Tech Charter School is seeking a new, temporary, or permanent home.  Marina is an Adult Learner, a mother, and the new CCAE Student Rep in the AB86 Workgroup.  She knows that "Parents’ education strongly affects children’s ability to adapt to their new country and succeed in their school life."

Immigrant parents know that in order for their kids succeed, they, themselves, the parents, need education and support

And half of all kids in California public schools have a foreign-born parent!  But does the Berkeley School District know this?


The Berkeley School District May Take Over the Berkeley Adult School Campus

Here's a blurb from the Berkeley Adult School Facebook page about what BAS is facing:

"Students - it's time to mobilize, advocate and save the integrity of Berkeley Adult School. Superintendent Dr. Donald Evans recommended to the School Board that a new elementary school be opened at the Adult School site and the dedicated Adult School site be eliminated. This was Option #7 among several options considered, which can be found on page 72 of the Agenda Packet (go to http://www.berkeleyschools.net/ and click on School Board to find documents). Option #7 calls for the Adult School program to be redistributed at sites throughout the District and the Adult School site being made ready for the elementary program for the 2016-17 school year. Message us here if you can come to meetings and help support our school."
Here is a powerpoint laying out the choices the Berkeley School District is considering to deal with increasing enrollment, including moving Berkeley Adult School off its campus.

Moving Berkeley Adult School off its campus does not mean it would move into a lovely new campus.  It means the program would be destabilized, would no longer serve as a community resource hub, and would have to shrink in size and services.
 
The Timeline
This information was presented to the public in November. In December, options are being narrowed down to two or three.  Rumour has it that taking over the Berkeley Adult School campus is one of the options being seriously considered.  A decision will be made in January.
All while the city of Berkeley is being rocked by responses to Ferguson, people celebrate the holidays, shop, eat, travel, discuss Cuba and North Korea and the CIA Torture Report.  And for some folks, throw in poverty, job loss, lack of English and civic skills, transportation problems, health problems, and depression - a big and unspoken problem for many people in the Holiday Season.
What does that mean for Berkeley Adult School?
It means it might be harder for students and staff to rally with a large and organized movement to retain their campus and their position as a stable and stabilizing community resource hub.
 
Berkeley Adult School Needs and Deserves Our Support
Because of the destabilization, cuts, and closures that hit all Adult Schools, Berkeley Adult School is the largest Adult School in its region.
Governor Brown, in his January 9th Budget Announcement, may finally provide secure funding for K12 Adult Schools and the new Regional Consortia system.  
Many across the state, individuals, organizations, and elected officials, understand the value of Adult Schools and Adult Education.  They have worked and continue to work for the stabilization and rebuilding of Adult Schools and Adult Education.  That's the whole purpose of AB86 and the new Regional Consortia system.
In these last days before Brown's announcement, as we move closer toward our goal and as Adult Schools and Community Colleges around the state work to find a way to work together to provide the best Adult Education possible, what value is there is destabilizing Berkeley Adult School even further?  What value is there in shrinking it in size and scope?
Do we see results in Oakland that Berkeley wants to emulate?  Or do we see results in Oakland that Berkeley wants to shut out?  There's a long history in Berkeley that could be called "Fear of Oakland."  There are many reasons for that, some of them not very pretty.  In the long run, those reasons need to be addressed.  In the short run, Berkeley should consider that the devastation of Oakland Adult School, which once served over 25,000 people, did not help Oakland and does not help the communities that surround it.  Destabilizing and shrinking the Berkeley Adult School is not the answer.  Keeping Berkeley Adult School strong and working to strengthen Adult Schools and Adult Education across the state is.
 
Action Steps We Can Take To Keep Berkeley Adult School in Place as a Community Resource Hub
Call or email a Berkeley School Board Member, local elected official, community organizations, or the media.
If you have connections to UC Berkeley, contact them.
Scan the list below for ideas and contacts and use your gut to pick the action step right for you.
As we've seen over and over, our choices matter.  It's our culture, our community, our state.
We can pretend we're powerless but the truth is we're not.  And what feels like a small step may in fact be the start of a domino effect that changes things for the better.  (Reminder:  the small step of doing nothing has results, too.)
You never until you try.
Go for it!
 
 
Helpful links and information:
 
1701 San Pablo Avenue, Berkeley, CA 94702 • Ph 510.644.6130 • Fx 510.644.6784
Note on Berkeley Adult School Facebook page
Students - it's time to mobilize, advocate and save the integrity of Berkeley Adult School. Superintendent Dr. Donald Evans recommended to the School Board that a new elementary school be opened at the Adult School site and the dedicated Adult School site be eliminated. This was Option #7 among several options considered, which can be found on page 72 of the Agenda Packet (go to http://www.berkeleyschools.net/ and click on School Board to find documents). Option #7 calls for the Adult School program to be redistributed at sites throughout the District and the Adult School site being made ready for the elementary program for the 2016-17 school year. Message us here if you can come to meetings and help support our school.
Upcoming Berkeley School Board Meetings
January 6  District English Language Advisory Committee (DELAC)
January 14th  - School Board Meeting
January 28th – School Board Meeting
City of Berkeley Webpage (has Mayor, City Council, etc.)
 
California Department of Education Office of Adult Education
Region 4 - Bay: Alameda, Contra Costa, San Francisco
Shadidi Sia-Maat    (Sia-Maat is also on the AB86 Workgroup)
ssiamaat@cde.ca.gov      916-323-7862
 
Media
Berkeley Times
Berkeleyside
Berkeley Voice
Oakland Tribune
Data
 
Organizations
 
 
Berkeley Adult School and San Mateo Adult and COSAS
meeting to discuss and promote Student Leadership and Advocacy for Adult Education
Fall 2013
 
 

 
 

 
 



Monday, December 15, 2014

CFT: Adult Educators Facing Uncertain Future

From the December 12 "Inside CFT" e-newsletter:

CFT fights for Adult Educators facing uncertain future

Adult educators across the state face an uncertain future.  The Local Control Funding Formula eliminated funding for adult education, and districts are only required to fund it through the end of this school year.  AB 86 legislation created new structures to fund adult ed in both K-12 and community colleges, but the process currently leaves teachers and students with more questions than answers.  The committees formed to answer those questions excluded educators, staff and students from the beginning.


After more than a year of lobbying and organizing, the statewide workgroup overseeing this process has finally been expanded to include representatives of teachers and staff.  The workgroup now includes Jack Carroll, a long-time adult educator and CFT member from the Pajaro Valley Federation of Teachers.  CFT and our labor partners are actively working with political leaders and staff in Sacramento to advance a set of priorities for adult education, recently crafted by CFT’s Adult Education Commission and adopted by our Executive Council. Over the next several months we expect to engage all of our adult educators in helping ensure that adult education is properly funded to serve the needs of our communities.
 

Big thanks to CFT for looking out for its members and for pointing out the instability in the situation which of course, affects CFT membership.

But the instability doesn't stop there.  Instability in Adult Education means loss of programs for Adult Learners and ultimately, instability and loss for the state...

because Adult Ed is the fourth leg stabilizing Public Education.

Adult Ed provides the support and education parents need to help K-12 kids succeed.  It's a second chance for the kids who didn't succeed in the K-12 system.  It's a step into higher education for both immigrants and native born residents.  And through it's myriad programs, it builds and strengthens communities, the ultimate key to social and economic health. 

Adult Education benefits everyone.

All the more reason for everyone to pitch in and secure it's future.

CFT, thanks for stepping up to help!




 
 

Must Read SYAS Blog Post Series on Community Colleges and Adult Schools: How They Work and Who Does What

The always chock full of facts and insight Save Your Adult School Blog has a new series on

Community Colleges and Adult Schools:  How They Work and Who Does What.

The series is a must-read.


For that reason, I'm providing links to post in the series and a few pull-out quotes here. 

I urge you to read the series in full.  (As posts are added to the series, I will add links here.)

1. Part 1   The Community Colleges Credit and Noncredit Programs.

"The “Ending California’s Public Adult Education…” presentation is well worth reading, as it explains why the noncredit/adult school model is under attack. While the model welcomes all students, it is particularly helpful for adults who are not only busy, but dealing with the stresses of poverty. In this type of class, students who had little formal schooling as children or never did well in the traditional school system find a home and begin to fulfill their potential. But with no grades, no credentials or degrees, no hard beginning and end date, it doesn’t look much like what we typically think of as “school.” It’s that “focus on learning” that throws people. Learning? What about grades and tests?
But anyone who has taught this type of class can tell you it works, and furthermore, there are standardized test results and other data that demonstrate its effectiveness. There is more than one way to educate people, and not everyone benefits from the formal school model."

2.  Part 2  Adult Schools:  Community Interest and Mandated Programs

"Adults with low levels of literacy are exactly the students both adult school mandated programs and community college noncredit programs were designed to serve. With more than five million people in need of these services, the efforts of both adult school mandated programs and community college noncredit programs are sorely needed, and both must be significantly expanded, if the educational needs of California’s adults are to be adequately met."

Sunday, December 14, 2014

Set Your Clocks to January 9

January 9th, 2015. 

A Friday.

That's when Governor Brown is expected to release his Budget Proposal.

The one that will say whether things will get easier or harder for K12 Adult Schools.


Here's the full scoop from CCAE on what that might mean for Adult Schools and what need to do in the time leading up to his announcement.

By the way, membership to CCAE is on half-price special for new members right now.  Your membership makes their advocacy possible.

 
In just a few short weeks, K12 adult education will have a much clearer understanding of the future and, by my estimation, it’s looking much brighter on the horizon—a new day is upon us. In the past two months we’ve been working vigorously to affect the January proposal before our window of opportunity closed. It appears that window is now closed as I’ve been notified that the Governor is in the Department of Finance making the final call on each of the various budget items as I prepare this update for you. While the window seems to be closed now, we’re keeping the curtains open. While nothing is certain until we see the Governor’s budget proposal on Friday, January 9th, we are feeling quite good about our prospects for the budget proposal and in it, our fate.
 
In preparation for the January budget release and in an effort to educate the Legislature on the importance of K12 adult education, we’ve also been working with our PR consultant in Sacramento on rounding up media interest and working a variety of other angles in the post-election realm.  Did you read the SacBee OpEd by Hacienda La Puente’s Alice Yoshioka? We’ve also seen some great work by Karen Arthur of Oxnard Adult School and Kristen Pursley of West Contra Costa Adult Education in EdSource. Further, we have more in the works for the coming weeks all in the interest in continuing to build the pressure for a workable budget proposal and setting the stage for the budget process to play out in the Legislature.
 
So…with the window closed for further negotiation with Finance, what are our next steps? 
Now we begin to focus our advocacy on the Legislature. We need to quickly shift our focus on preparing the Legislature for the budget discussion that will play out over the next six months.  What makes this potentially more complicated is that there are over 35 new members between the two houses with little or no experience with K12 adult education. We must work quickly to bring them up to speed on who we are in their district, the value of K12 adult education to their constituency, the history of funding, share your current efforts around AB 86 planning and provide and explain from your K12 perspective your actual AB 86 regional plan. I would draw particular focus to a couple of key new Assembly members with prime chairmanships – Assemblyman Patrick O’Donnell (D-Long Beach) who was tapped to chair the Assembly Education Committee and Assemblyman Kevin McCarty (D-Sacramento) who was tapped to chair the Assembly Budget Subcommittee #2 for Education Finance by Assembly Speaker Toni Atkins (D-San Diego) last week. I’m feeling quite comfortable with these new chairs, but regardless those of you in their districts need to move quickly to develop relationships with these critically important members. Unfortunately, as of this update the Senate has yet to announce committee chairs and we continue to wait for committee membership in both houses.  Once we have a better sense of committee makeup, we’ll be pushing you all to add to the list of members to focus on. Stay tuned on that point, but in the meantime keep in mind….they need to learn stand on their own feet on the issue before they can run with our “asks.”  As such, start with the basics first and foremost.  Once you’ve managed to get them acquainted with K12 adult education in their district, share with them the importance of 2015’s budget process and what their district stands to lose absent getting this year’s budget right. You can share with them our work with the Department of Finance and that our priorities for the January budget proposal are focused on a couple of key issues:
 
• A Dedicated, Stable Funding Structure for K-12 Adult Schools
• Transition Year—Maintain Current K-12 Capacity
• Utilizing Existing State Fiscal Infrastructures to Apportion Funding
• AB 86 Plans Inform & Drive Funding
 
Further, in order to get to the core of these key issues, we’ve put forth two critical “asks” for the FY 15-16 budget proposal as follows:
 
1. Maintain & Stabilize K-12 Capacity with a Transition Year

                    - Maintenance of Capacity Funding for K12 Out of FY 15-16 Allocation
- Helps avoid March 15th layoff notices, provides stability and avoids closures of adult schools because it helps provide greater certainty for school districts in planning their budgets for the FY 15-16 school year

2. Perkins Model Distribution of Funding—CDE Allocation to K12 Districts through Interagency Agreement w/ CCCO

                    - Ensures K12 adult education remains tied and accessible to the community you serve
- Maintains the autonomy of School Boards of Education
- Why reinvent the wheel – the structure already exists without adding to the bureaucracy
- Doesn’t compromise local decision making through the regional consortia
 
If you haven’t already, please move quickly to conduct meet-and-greets with your members – new or incumbent – while they are in the district.  The next few weeks are the perfect time to conduct these meetings—especially with the new members who are eager to get rolling ahead of January 5th when the session resumes in Sacramento.  In order to assist you with identifying your elected representatives, please see http://findyourrep.legislature.ca.gov/.  Additionally, we have provided the attached rosters to assist you with scheduling meetings.   
 
Finally, we have condensed the key issues and “asks” for your meetings to help ensure we are all speaking the same language and proposing the same concepts. We hope you find the one-pager helpful!
 
While nothing is certain until we see the actual budget language, we are feeling quite positive about January’s budget release and feel like a new day is upon us. We know the details will be important and some of them may not be exactly what we would propose; however, we’ve made considerable headway on some of the more critical overarching issues that we believe will be positively reflected in the proposal.  Time will tell—just a few short weeks—but keep those curtains open to let in the sunshine.  A new day is upon us…
Strength in numbers!
 
AB86: Adult Schools' Current Capacity Needs to Be a Priority for 2015–2016 
The AB86 Regional Consortia planning is at a critical stage of development as the December 31st deliverables are being finalized now. Although it's still uncertain what the adult education funding formula and method of distribution for next year will be, it's clear that the K-12 adult schools are depending on the AB86 funding that has been promised by the Governor and the Legislature.  The maintenance of current capacity for adult education needs to be included in the regional plans.  Maintenance of Capacity can be defined as the dollar amounts for "maintenance of effort" at a minimum. 
 
There are several places in the regional plan template  (table 1.1, table 4.1) where consortia are asked to report on the funding required to deliver current levels of service and to project the costs for the future.   While funding for next year will be unclear until the state's budget is passed in June, CCAE and CAEAA strongly encourage adult school advocates to make sure that regional consortium plans include the following:
  • Adult schools' continue operation depends on the AB86 funds.  This should be made explicit in the plans.
  • Adult schools' support needs to be prioritized in the plans to maintain current capacity.
  • Tables, charts, or narratives should make clear what current funds are already  in place to support adult education (WIA funds, non-credit or credit basic skills funds already available in the community colleges), and what additional funds will be needed to maintain current capacity, as well as to address gaps and expand services.
 

Wednesday, December 10, 2014

Students Get A Seat At The Table

Fantastic news!

Students will (finally) get a seat at the decision-making table.

There will be two student reps amongst the new AB86 Workgroup Configuration.

AB86 has also (finally) issued information about these changes.  You can read their info here.

The newest list of AB86 Workgroup members, which includes 2 slots for Student Reps, is below.

Before you read it, take a minute to consider the huge efforts students have made and continue to make to speak up about Adult Education, Adult Schools, and their right to be heard and included.

Read what San Mateo Adult School Student Council President Marco said about the need for student inclusion.

And say thank you to Marco and all the other students who spoke up for what should have been recognized long ago: 

Students Matter.  If we are going to build the best Adult Education system possible, their experience, ideas, insight, and wisdom must be at the decision-making table.

AB 86 Work Group (as of 12/10/14)


NameOrganization
John StanskasAcademic Senate for California Community Colleges
Student Representative - TBDAcademic Senate for California Community Colleges
Mike ReeseAssociation of California Community College Administrators
Rocky BettarAssociation of California School Administrators
JoAnn HigdonAssociation of Chief Business Officials
Cynthia Parulan-ColferCalifornia Adult Education Administration Association 
California Association of School Business Officials*
Rirchard HansenCalifornia Community College Independents 
Duncan GrahamCalifornia Community Colleges Chief Instructional Officers
Kathy DavisCalifornia Council for Adult Education
Student Representative - TBDCalifornia Council for Adult Education
California County Superintendents Educational Services Association* 
Jack CarrollCalifornia Federation of Teachers
Teri BurnsCalifornia School Boards Association
Tristan BrownCalifornia School Employees Association
Wendy PlewCalifornia Teachers Association
Bob HarperCampbell Adult and Community Education 
Neil KellyCCCCO Specialist, Career Education Practices
Carmen Martinez-CalderonCDE  Coordinated Student Support and Adult Education Division
Shadidi Sai-MaatCDE Coordinated Student Support and Adult Education Division
Lynette NyaggahCommunity College Association
Community College League of California*
Kris FertelFaculty Association of California Community Colleges
Andrea RodriguezLAUSD Division of Adult and Career Education
Candace LeeLAUSD, Division of Adult and Career Education 
Joanne DurkeeMt. Diablo Adult and Career Education 
Donna BurnsMt. San Antonio College 
Greg SchulzNorth Orange County Community College District 
Erica LeblancSanta Monica College 
 United Teachers of Los Angeles*
*This organization has not yet named a participant.

Friday, December 5, 2014

Edsource Commentary: "Adult Schools Need Dedicated Funding"

In Edsource, a commentary by Karen Arthur and Kristen Pursely:

Adult schools need dedicated funding

In his 2013 budget, Gov. Jerry Brown included a provision to safeguard existing adult schools from further cuts and closures. The “maintenance of effort” clause mandated that school districts maintain their current level of funding for adult education for two years, during the formation of regional consortia, as outlined by Assembly Bill 86.

The maintenance of effort expires at the end of the current school year. Adult schools and community colleges are currently engaged in a regional planning process to create consortia between adult schools and community colleges, with the regions defined by community college districts. Brown has indicated that he intends to provide money for adult education through the regional consortia, although he has not yet spelled out how to do so.

Regional consortia funding would come through the Community College Chancellor’s Office, not through the Department of Education. The governor and the finance department favor this model because it simplifies the budgets of K-12 schools under the Local Control Funding Formula, which permanently eliminated adult education as a protected program.

Brown’s goal of putting “responsibility where it should be,” by eliminating the prescriptive commands from Sacramento, is admirable. However, the educational needs of California’s adults were not considered when this model was adopted – and, not surprisingly, the model would serve them poorly. Simply transferring the money for adult education to community colleges without restrictions will not assure the colleges will actually spend money for this purpose.
Adult schools have enabled low-skilled learners to transition to community college or the workforce and to engage in civic and community life. Money was provided through protected funding – categorical programs – to ensure that economically vulnerable groups had access to educational programs. We’ve already seen what can happen without these protections. During the last recession, when the Legislature let districts use adult ed funds at their discretion, adult schools suffered devastating cuts – more than any other sector of public education. During the 2007-08 school year, the state spent about $750 million on adult education through K-12 funding. The amount spent under budget flexibility, and during the last two years of maintenance of effort, is estimated to be about $350 million. Two years ago,  Brown proposed $500 million as an adult education budget for the 2015-16 school year.

Adult school instructors worked alongside all public school teachers to pass temporary taxes under Proposition 30. Its passage brought in $6 billion for California’s public education programs. However, adult schools have seen no restoration of their devastated budgets.

Rural adult schools at risk

The consortia are designed to preserve the “dual delivery system” (adult schools and community colleges) while bringing the two systems into better alignment. Two of the strongest arguments for retaining adult schools were that 1) adult schools are more geographically accessible for many California adults than community colleges and 2) adult schools support the mission of K-12 schools.
There are about 300 adult schools in California, and 112 community colleges. Community colleges tend to be located in urban areas. Rural and remote areas, if they are served at all, are more likely to be served by an adult school. Community colleges may put their own needs first and cut or close adult schools in their consortium area the next time there is a financial crisis if all funding for adult education comes through them, just as school districts closed their adult schools during the last financial crisis. Adult schools in remote and rural locations, which serve a smaller and less organized student body, will be most at risk.

Adult schools do provide significant support to the mission of K-12 schools, by increasing parent involvement in their children’s education and helping parents develop the skills to support their children’s school success through English as a Second Language, family literacy and parent education classes at school sites. Supporting the parents and the community of low-income, English-learner children – the students that the Local Control Funding Formula is designed to help – is crucial to their success.

As the need for ESL instruction increases with Obama’s immigration plan, it is critical that reform measures protect the existing educational infrastructures in the adult school system. A report by the Migration Policy Institute, a Washington, D.C., based policy organization, outlined its concern that current reform efforts may adversely affect learners who are less prepared. The report notes that adult students with higher levels of English proficiency and academic preparation will be able to make the transition to postsecondary degrees and certificate programs, but policies need to ensure the inclusion of learners struggling to master basic skills.

A dual funding system to both community colleges and adult schools is necessary to ensure a dual delivery system. We cannot afford to risk further cuts to K-12 adult ed, an important educational safety net that has a far-reaching societal impact. California’s adult schools need dedicated funding in order to:
  • Create equity within the consortia;
  • Assure adequate and equitable funding for adult schools;
  • Keep adult education accessible;
  • Ensure that needs of adult learners are met.
The Legislative Analyst’s Office 2012 report advised that the state maintain an adult education system that includes both K-12 adult schools and community colleges. They also recommended that adult schools be returned to categorical status.

The current plan for one funding stream puts adult schools at risk for further cuts and closures. School districts plan their budgets a year in advance. Dedicated funding for K-12 adult ed, starting with the budget that Gov. Brown will present in January, will assure that adult schools survive and continue to meet the need for adult education services in California.
•••

Karen ArthurKristen PursleyKristen Pursley is an adult education teacher with West Contra Costa Adult Education, founding member of COSAS – Communities Organized to Support Adult Schools – and writes the Save Your Adult School blog.

Karen Arthur is an Oxnard Adult School teacher and founding member of Alliance for California Adult Schools.


Karen Arthur                                                                                                              Kristen Pursely
 
The opinions expressed in this commentary represent solely those of the author. EdSource welcomes commentaries representing diverse points of view. If you would like to submit a commentary, please contact us.

Note from Adult Education Matters:

Consider sharing your own ideas, insights, and wisdom in the form of a comment on the commentary.  And be sure to read the comments others leave.  Adult Education and Adult Schools do not get adequate coverage in the media.  This piece not only explains the value of Adult Education and Adult Schools and the challenges they face, it also provides an opportunity for dialogue.

Take it!



                                                                                                                                

Wednesday, December 3, 2014

The New AB86 Workgroup

The AB86 website now lists the new members of the Workgroup.

Reminder:  The Work Group does the nitty-gritty work.  The Cabinet is the Big Boss.

What's happening in there?
There was no official announcement about this change.  There was no email sent to those of us on the email list.  There is nothing in their November Newsletter.   There was no explanation or announcement of why or how the change was made.

Perhaps the Cabinet, the "Decider," had very good reasons for making these changes.

They did not choose, however, to share them.

They did not choose transparency.

I find that troubling.

Here, in any case, is the information on the AB86 Website:

AB 86 Work Group

The AB 86 Work Group, established by the AB 86 Cabinet, has twelve members, four representing adult education programs in school districts and four representing adult education programs in community colleges. Four staff members, two from the CCCCO and two from the CDE, are also in the Work group. This Work Group will develop a comprehensive Request for Application to fund planning and implementation grants.

If you have comments or questions for the Work Group, we encourage you to use the orange “feedback” button to the left of the page so that your feedback can be properly reviewed.

Below is a listing of the AB 86 Work Group Members:

NameOrganization
John StanskasAcademic Senate for California Community Colleges
Mike ReeseAssociation of California Community College Administrators
Rocky BettarAssociation of California School Administrators
Association of Chief Business Officials*
Cynthia Parulan-ColferCalifornia Adult Education Administration Association 
California Association of School Business Officials*
Rirchard HansenCalifornia Community College Independents 
S. Craig JusticeCalifornia Community Colleges Chief Instructional Officers
Chris NelsonCalifornia Council for Adult Education
Kathy DavisCalifornia Council for Adult Education
California County Superintendents Educational Services Association* 
Jack CarrollCalifornia Federation of Teachers
Teri BurnsCalifornia School Boards Association
Tristan BrownCalifornia School Employees Association
Wendy PlewCalifornia Teachers Association
Bob HarperCampbell Adult and Community Education 
Debra JonesCCCCO Dean, Career Education Practices
Neil KellyCCCCO Specialist, Career Education Practices
Carmen Martinez-CalderonCDE  Coordinated Student Support and Adult Education Division
Shadidi Sai-MaatCDE Coordinated Student Support and Adult Education Division
Lynette NyaggahCommunity College Association
Community College League of California*
Kris FertelFaculty Association of California Community Colleges
Andrea RodriguezLAUSD Division of Adult and Career Education
Candace LeeLAUSD, Division of Adult and Career Education 
Joanne DurkeeMt. Diablo Adult and Career Education 
Donna BurnsMt. San Antonio College 
Greg SchulzNorth Orange County Community College District 
Erica LeblancSanta Monica College 
 United Teachers of Los Angeles*

*This organization has not yet named a participant.

You can read another post on this topic here.

In that post, I describe what some of these organizations do.